Today in Shark News

A daily dose of shark news.
Reader photographs shark on beach


  Daily News reader Sementia Ann Reaves submitted this photo to the Daily News and wrote: “I was on my morning walk today (Monday) about 11 a.m. and saw a group of guys who had caught a bull shark (in Destin). After they and others took photos of the shark, one of the guys grabbed it by the tail and dorsal fin and steered it back into the surf. The shark then swam off.”

Reader photographs shark on beach

Daily News reader Sementia Ann Reaves submitted this photo to the Daily News and wrote: “I was on my morning walk today (Monday) about 11 a.m. and saw a group of guys who had caught a bull shark (in Destin). After they and others took photos of the shark, one of the guys grabbed it by the tail and dorsal fin and steered it back into the surf. The shark then swam off.”

Angler Jumps Overboard to Save 300-Pound Bull Shark

Catching and releasing a shark usually involves an angler removing a hook or cutting the line and watching the shark swim away. This bold angler outside of Lee County, Fla., decided he wanted to assure that the exhausted 300-pound predator he had just caught could swim away safely.

Seeing that the bull shark was struggling, the fisherman jumped overboard and wrapped his arms around the lower half of its body, helping the shark regain some energy. It appeared to work.

Bull sharks are considered by many to be among the most dangerous sharks in the world. This one could have attacked even in its exhausted state, but this angler decided to risk his life to make sure the shark could swim away safely.

Suwanee woman bitten by shark in Jacksonville

Colleen Malone was bitten on the foot June 25 while visiting Jacksonville, Fla. The 19-year-old college student says she was standing in about four feet of water about 40 feet from shore when she saw two fins. She started swimming away and says she was bitten on the foot by what appeared to be a bull shark about three feet long. Doctors sewed up her foot with about 50 stitches and are treating her with antibiotics.

Bull shark in the Wabash River is a story with no bite


When a fisherman caught a bull shark recently off the Florida Keys, he came across an unlikely surprise: One of the shark’s live fetuses had two heads.
The fisherman kept the odd specimen, and shared it with scientists, who described it in a study published online today (March 25) in the Journal of Fish Biology. It’s one of the very few examples of a two-headed shark ever recorded — there about six instances in published reports — and the first time this has been seen in a bull shark, said Michael Wagner, a study co-author and researcher at Michigan State University.

When a fisherman caught a bull shark recently off the Florida Keys, he came across an unlikely surprise: One of the shark’s live fetuses had two heads.

The fisherman kept the odd specimen, and shared it with scientists, who described it in a study published online today (March 25) in the Journal of Fish Biology. It’s one of the very few examples of a two-headed shark ever recorded — there about six instances in published reports — and the first time this has been seen in a bull shark, said Michael Wagner, a study co-author and researcher at Michigan State University.

(Source: Yahoo!)